'I started painting in Brazil. Life was very hard, there was no money for paints, but I used to buy cheap materials and paint like crazy. It was a matter of life or death for me'.

 

- Mira Schendel 

 

 

  Schendel drew inspiration from Morandi, de Chirico and Klee. She also began to question the flatness of the picture plane and to move her work towards abstraction. Her work constitutes an experimental investigation into profound philosophical questions relating to human existence and belief, often addressing the distinction between faith and certainty, and examining ideas of being, existence and the void. She saw her work as activating the void, thus poised between being and nothingness.

 

In her early work she experimented with various modes of abstraction, both in painting and drawing. Her work in the 1960s is characterised by a move towards geometry, revealing the influence of concrete painting, a form of abstraction where the composition, free of figurative or symbolic references, stresses the artwork as an independent object.

 

 

'No matter how much I use elemental forms, the sensory element of the brushstroke, the texture, is always there; for me this is very important. I would never make a completely smooth painting'.

 

 

- Mira Schendel